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abcstarstuff:

NASA’S KEPLER ANNOUNCES11 PLANETARY SYSTEMS HOSTING 26 PLANETS
NASA’s Kepler mission has discovered 11 new planetary systems hosting26 confirmed planets. These discoveries nearly double the number ofverified planets and triple the number of stars known to have morethan one planet that transits, or passes in front of, the star. Suchsystems will help astronomers better understand how planets form.
The planets orbit close to their host stars and range in size from 1.5times the radius of Earth to larger than Jupiter. Fifteen are betweenEarth and Neptune in size. Further observations will be required todetermine which are rocky like Earth and which have thick gaseousatmospheres like Neptune. The planets orbit their host star once everysix to 143 days. All are closer to their host star than Venus is toour Sun.
“Prior to the Kepler mission, we knew of perhaps 500 exoplanets acrossthe whole sky,” said Doug Hudgins, Kepler program scientist at NASAHeadquarters in Washington. “Now, in just two years staring at a patchof sky not much bigger than your fist, Kepler has discovered more than60 planets and more than 2,300 planet candidates. This tells us thatour galaxy is positively loaded with planets of all sizes and orbits.”
Kepler identifies planet candidates by repeatedly measuring the changein brightness of more than 150,000 stars to detect when a planetpasses in front of the star. That passage casts a small shadow towardEarth and the Kepler spacecraft.
Each of the new confirmed planetary systems contains two to fiveclosely spaced transiting planets. In tightly packed planetarysystems, the gravitational pull of the planets on each other causessome planets to accelerate and some to decelerate along their orbits.The acceleration causes the orbital period of each planet to change.Kepler detects this effect by measuring the changes, or so-calledTransit Timing Variations (TTVs).
Planetary systems with TTVs can be verified without requiringextensive ground-based observations, accelerating confirmation ofplanet candidates. The TTV detection technique also increases Kepler’sability to confirm planetary systems around fainter and more distantstars.
Five of the systems (Kepler-25, Kepler-27, Kepler-30, Kepler-31 andKepler-33) contain a pair of planets where the inner planet orbits thestar twice during each orbit of the outer planet. Four of the systems(Kepler-23, Kepler-24, Kepler-28 and Kepler-32) contain a pairingwhere the outer planet circles the star twice for every three timesthe inner planet orbits its star.
“These configurations help to amplify the gravitational interactionsbetween the planets, similar to how my sons kick their legs on a swingat the right time to go higher,” said Jason Steffen, the Brinsonpostdoctoral fellow at Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics inBatavia, Ill., and lead author of a paper confirming four of thesystems.
Kepler-33, a star that is older and more massive than our Sun, had themost planets. The system hosts five planets, ranging in size from 1.5to 5 times that of Earth. All of the planets are located closer totheir star than any planet is to our Sun.
The properties of a star provide clues for planet detection. Thedecrease in the star’s brightness and duration of a planet transit,combined with the properties of its host star, present a recognizablesignature. When astronomers detect planet candidates that exhibitsimilar signatures around the same star, the likelihood of any ofthese planet candidates being a false positive is very low.
“The approach used to verify the Kepler-33 planets shows the overallreliability is quite high,” said Jack Lissauer, planetary scientist atNASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, Calif., and lead author ofthe paper on Kepler-33. “This is a validation by multiplicity.”
These discoveries are published in four different papers in theAstrophysical Journal and the Monthly Notices of the RoyalAstronomical Society.
IMAGE…..Kepler’s Planetary Systems, Jan. 2012The artist’s rendering depicts the multiple planet systems discovered by NASA’s Kepler mission. Out of hundreds of candidate planetary systems, scientists had previously verified six systems with multiple transiting planets (denoted here in red). Now, Kepler observations have verified planets (shown here in green) in 11 new planetary systems. Many of these systems contain additional planet candidates that are yet to be verified (shown here in dark purple). For reference, the eight planets of the solar system are shown in blue.
Credit: NASA Ames/Jason Steffen, Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics

abcstarstuff:

NASA’S KEPLER ANNOUNCES
11 PLANETARY SYSTEMS HOSTING 26 PLANETS

NASA’s Kepler mission has discovered 11 new planetary systems hosting
26 confirmed planets. These discoveries nearly double the number of
verified planets and triple the number of stars known to have more
than one planet that transits, or passes in front of, the star. Such
systems will help astronomers better understand how planets form.

The planets orbit close to their host stars and range in size from 1.5
times the radius of Earth to larger than Jupiter. Fifteen are between
Earth and Neptune in size. Further observations will be required to
determine which are rocky like Earth and which have thick gaseous
atmospheres like Neptune. The planets orbit their host star once every
six to 143 days. All are closer to their host star than Venus is to
our Sun.

“Prior to the Kepler mission, we knew of perhaps 500 exoplanets across
the whole sky,” said Doug Hudgins, Kepler program scientist at NASA
Headquarters in Washington. “Now, in just two years staring at a patch
of sky not much bigger than your fist, Kepler has discovered more than
60 planets and more than 2,300 planet candidates. This tells us that
our galaxy is positively loaded with planets of all sizes and orbits.”

Kepler identifies planet candidates by repeatedly measuring the change
in brightness of more than 150,000 stars to detect when a planet
passes in front of the star. That passage casts a small shadow toward
Earth and the Kepler spacecraft.

Each of the new confirmed planetary systems contains two to five
closely spaced transiting planets. In tightly packed planetary
systems, the gravitational pull of the planets on each other causes
some planets to accelerate and some to decelerate along their orbits.
The acceleration causes the orbital period of each planet to change.
Kepler detects this effect by measuring the changes, or so-called
Transit Timing Variations (TTVs).

Planetary systems with TTVs can be verified without requiring
extensive ground-based observations, accelerating confirmation of
planet candidates. The TTV detection technique also increases Kepler’s
ability to confirm planetary systems around fainter and more distant
stars.

Five of the systems (Kepler-25, Kepler-27, Kepler-30, Kepler-31 and
Kepler-33) contain a pair of planets where the inner planet orbits the
star twice during each orbit of the outer planet. Four of the systems
(Kepler-23, Kepler-24, Kepler-28 and Kepler-32) contain a pairing
where the outer planet circles the star twice for every three times
the inner planet orbits its star.

“These configurations help to amplify the gravitational interactions
between the planets, similar to how my sons kick their legs on a swing
at the right time to go higher,” said Jason Steffen, the Brinson
postdoctoral fellow at Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics in
Batavia, Ill., and lead author of a paper confirming four of the
systems.

Kepler-33, a star that is older and more massive than our Sun, had the
most planets. The system hosts five planets, ranging in size from 1.5
to 5 times that of Earth. All of the planets are located closer to
their star than any planet is to our Sun.

The properties of a star provide clues for planet detection. The
decrease in the star’s brightness and duration of a planet transit,
combined with the properties of its host star, present a recognizable
signature. When astronomers detect planet candidates that exhibit
similar signatures around the same star, the likelihood of any of
these planet candidates being a false positive is very low.

“The approach used to verify the Kepler-33 planets shows the overall
reliability is quite high,” said Jack Lissauer, planetary scientist at
NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, Calif., and lead author of
the paper on Kepler-33. “This is a validation by multiplicity.”

These discoveries are published in four different papers in the
Astrophysical Journal and the Monthly Notices of the Royal
Astronomical Society.

IMAGE…..Kepler’s Planetary Systems, Jan. 2012
The artist’s rendering depicts the multiple planet systems discovered by NASA’s Kepler mission. Out of hundreds of candidate planetary systems, scientists had previously verified six systems with multiple transiting planets (denoted here in red). Now, Kepler observations have verified planets (shown here in green) in 11 new planetary systems. Many of these systems contain additional planet candidates that are yet to be verified (shown here in dark purple). For reference, the eight planets of the solar system are shown in blue.

Credit: NASA Ames/Jason Steffen, Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics

yelpingwithcormac:

Union Square - San Francisco, CA

Cormac M. | Author | Lost in the chaparral, NM

Two stars.

The traveler found himself in a gilded and luminescent valley of commerce beset on all sides by baying signage, the air redolent in fine leather and human urine. He turned and saw behind plate glass two…

barackobama:

Did we just make POTUS singing Al Green a ringtone? Yep, we just made POTUS singing Al Green a ringtone. Get it here for free.

barackobama:

Did we just make POTUS singing Al Green a ringtone? Yep, we just made POTUS singing Al Green a ringtone. Get it here for free.

americasgreatoutdoors:

Sometimes considered “three parks in one,” Big Bend National Park in West Texas includes mountain, desert, and river environments. An hour’s drive can take you from the banks of the Rio Grande to a mountain basin nearly a mile high. Here, you can explore one of the last remaining wild corners of the United States, and experience unmatched sights, sounds, and solitude.Photo: National Park Service 

americasgreatoutdoors:

Sometimes considered “three parks in one,” Big Bend National Park in West Texas includes mountain, desert, and river environments. An hour’s drive can take you from the banks of the Rio Grande to a mountain basin nearly a mile high. Here, you can explore one of the last remaining wild corners of the United States, and experience unmatched sights, sounds, and solitude.

Photo: National Park Service 

mothernaturenetwork:

Climate change gives gardeners new optionsThe USDA has updated its planting-zones map for the first time in 22 years, reflecting a warmer U.S. where many southern crops are expanding north.

mothernaturenetwork:

Climate change gives gardeners new options
The USDA has updated its planting-zones map for the first time in 22 years, reflecting a warmer U.S. where many southern crops are expanding north.

THG BANNERS - including Districts 1-13, the Capitol, and a Down With the Capitol Banner!

girlwhowasonfire:

Click read more to see the banners and to get the code links!

Read More

pdsmith:

Rooftop airport, by Paul Frank, Amazing Stories (1928).
More (Ptak). [via @UnlikelyWorlds] 

pdsmith:

Rooftop airport, by Paul Frank, Amazing Stories (1928).

More (Ptak). [via @UnlikelyWorlds

whereiscoachbombay:

Buster likes to sit on Alex.

whereiscoachbombay:

Buster likes to sit on Alex.

dharbin:

TYRANNOSAURUS BATS! Now available as an 8” x 10” color indigo-process print. Perfect for that hard-to-shop-for superhero with a taste for expensive robot dinosaur sidekicks!

dharbin:

TYRANNOSAURUS BATS! Now available as an 8” x 10” color indigo-process print. Perfect for that hard-to-shop-for superhero with a taste for expensive robot dinosaur sidekicks!

dronejournalism:

The United States Supreme Court ruled on Monday that the police cannot attach a GPS tracker to someone’s car without first getting clearance from a court. The link goes to a Wall Street Journal story about the opinion. In summary, the majority of the court ruled that the GPS devices were not a trivial matter, and that they warranted judicial review before their use. Using the small, inexpensive devices to track people amounted to a violation of the person’s Fourth Amendment Rights against unlawful searches and seizures. In separate consenting opinions, Justices Sotomayor and Alito wrote that the GPS trackers went beyond an unlawful search. Justice Alito wrote that the devices were also a invasion of an individuals “reasonable expectation of privacy.”

The passage that particularly caught my eye was Justice Sotomayor writing: “Awareness that the Government may be watching chills associational and expressive freedoms.  And the Government’s unrestrained power to assemble data that reveal private aspects of identity is susceptible to abuse.  The net result is that GPS monitoring—by making available at a relatively low cost such a substantial quantum of intimate information about any person whom the Government, in its unfettered discretion, chooses to track—may “alter the relationship between citizen and government in a way that is inimical to democratic society.”

Replace GPS with Drone and read that again.